Movie Review: Love Per Square Foot

I first heard of this movie in a tweet I happened to read, one day when I happened to be scrolling through Twitter after absolutely ages. It was completely by chance, is what I am saying. Since I was hoofing it to Pune for 10 days, I figured that I could watch it on my downtime over there. [Which is essentially all the time I am there.]

There is very little chance I would have this movie any other way though. But I am rather glad I did!

Story: Sanjay Chaturvedi has one goal in life: to have his own home. His father is retiring soon from the railways, and the family is set to move back to Kanpur. Having been raised in Mumbai, and spent the bulk of his life there, Sanjay is not happy with this status quo. He wants to own his place, because he sees in it a culmination of all the dreams that he cherishes.

Karina D’Souza feels much the same way. Her mother and she are stuck living in a home that is quite literally falling down around their ears. It is her uncle’s house, and they stay there out of the goodness of his heart. Or something like that. Karina believes that her own home will solve her problems, while her mother thinks that her daughter needs to marry the nice neighbourhood boy with the big house, and that will solve their problems.

Both Sanjay and Karina work for the same bank, and their paths eventually cross at a colleague’s wedding. They are instantly attracted to each, and come up with a crazy scheme to buy a house together: a marriage of convenience. But, there is many a slip ‘twixt cup and lip, and things don’t always fall neatly into place.

Review: The movie is adorable and, while the premise is slightly outlandish, the trials and tribulations are quite relatable. I would definitely recommend this movie and a light-hearted one-time watch. It has dramatic moments, but no Bollywood-style rivers of tears and recriminations. Just normal people reacting normally to situations that normally slip our of their control and understanding in the best way they can.

Story: The story moves forward at a rapid clip, and there are no dull moments. The editing is sharp and concise, and at no time is their time to feel bored. That being said, the movie potentially suffers a little from not exploring all its angles sufficiently. The interfaith relationship, the practical aspects of Indian feminism, the infidelity angle, and so on are resolved rather hastily. They could have withstood a little more scrutiny, but it doesn’t feel rushed either.

Characters: I loved the strong characters. The independence of each protagonist in their own right was refreshing. It is one of the few Hindi movies that is so light, content-wise, and yet doesn’t feel like the female lead is cast opposite a male lead, but they are cast together. It was magical. On a side note, I do wish some of the other supporting cast [like the friends] had meatier roles. They looked interesting.

Acting: Ratna Pathak Shah and Supriya Pathak Kapur. Unbelievable those two are. The others were great, but clearly new. The girl playing Rashi though? Good grief, over the top.

What I liked: It is nice to see different cinema coming out of the Bollywood stable. I am rather tired of the big blockbuster style movies, which are thinly scripted, overly designed, and lack in practically every aspect. In my opinion, it is possible to have relatable fun cinema without having it cover the underbelly of a city, or explore the ravages of mental illness, or have everyone sobbing in their seats. After all, laughter is also a part of life!

What I disliked: Nothing specific. I quite liked the movie!

Rating: ✩✩✩✩

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